Even when you’re ill, a writer should always be taking notes

I have gone down with Manflu, it’s probably terminal, but on the off chance that I will survive this plague I would like to share this wisdom with you from my death bed.

Being ill gives a writer the chance to experience different sensations and feelings within their physical and emotional bodies that can be invaluable in future writing. Let’s face it, not every character in every book ever written is in the best of health, whether from some ailment (obviously not as bad as Manflu) illness or physical difficulty. So as incapacitated as I am I have my writers head on and I am keeping notes of how I feel, where it hurts most and perhaps how I feel about being ill.

Writers are constantly told to use writing that express how you feel, how did that character feel when so and so did that, or when whatever happened to them. A short term illness enables the writer to re-connect with those sensations and use them in their writing. Their mobility may be hindered, I know that when as a child and I head sinusitis, I thought my head would explode when I went swimming and dived in the pool.

There are so may ways that illness can make us examine how the human body reacts and acts to different situations and being on hand to write these feelings, emotional and physical limitations and so on can bring that much touted authenticity to your writing.

So, even as I lay in my death bed with the worst bout of Manflu in history (and it’s getting worse!) I have managed to drag myself to my pc to share this with you, for who knows, some miraculous cure may well be on the horizon.

As I have blogged before, a writer is NEVER OFF DUTY, make sure you have the tools to hand for any and every eventuality. It will be needed somewhere down the line.

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About purpleandrew

Andrew, recently diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome is a 53 year old former geologist always had short hair, suited & booted for work. That all changed when the credit crunch hit. Now a complimentary therapist, hospital radio presenter, and writer. Andrew writes crime thrillers, Young Adult, and fantasy books as well as blogging about writing and other stuff that he feels strongly about.
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